Pepper Plants for the 2011 Season

jolokia

All of the pepper seeds for the Hawkins Springs Farm 2011 Season have been planted.  This year’s 27 varieties include a nice mix of hot and sweet peppers.  All varieties are well suited to Oklahoma weather.

New peppers for this season include a couple of new bell varieties and several varieties developed by the Chili Pepper Institute (CPI) in New Mexico, including their Heritage “Big Jim”, sometimes referred to as “Hatch peppers”.  It is an anaheim- green chili-type pepper, which is a favorite for roasting and making chili rellanos.  Back for a repeat performance will be the famous Bhut Jolokia, aka “ghost pepper”, still holding the record as the world’s hottest pepper.  These pepper plants should be ready to purchase beginning in Mid-April/first of May.

There will be 10 varieties of Sweet Peppers available this year:

Sweet Banana

Sweet Banana

An AAS Bronze Medal winner for 1941 and still extremely popular. Large, pointed fruits measure 6-7″ long and 1-1/2″ across. The mild yellow peppers ultimately turn brilliant red. A favorite for pickling.  Last year, this was a heavy producer.

Ariane Orange Dutch

Ariane Orange Dutch

The Ariane Orange Dutch pepper was developed to honor the House of Orange, the Royal family of Holland. It is a big, blocky pepper 4 to 5 long and almost as wide, changing from medium green to vivid orange. In the summer, each sturdy plant yields a plentiful harvest of uniform, three- to four-lobed, persimmon-orange peppers. The thick flesh is crunchy and spicy-sweet, making ‘Ariane’ a natural for the grill or perfect for stir-fry. In a hot wok, flash-fry slivers of ‘Ariane’ with garlic, ginger root, and thinly sliced firm-fleshed fish, chicken or tofu. Drizzle with sesame oil, sprinkle with fresh cilantro. Plants are resistant to the tobacco mosaic virus. Plants have plenty of foliage to protect developing fruit. A superior variety that should be included in any sweet pepper garden.

California Wonder

California Wonder

These peppers are thick-walled and blocky, about 4 inches tall and wide, with a crisp, mild flavor and terrific sweetness. They mature from green to red on the plant, and are ideal for stuffing, slicing into rings for dips and salad toppings, and chopping into crisp bite-sized nibbles. Expect a big harvest from these vigorous plants, which reach 28 to 30 inches high. Part of the secret of California Wonder’s success is its resistance to Tobacco Mosaic Virus, which keeps the foliage healthy and strong all season long. You can’t go wrong with this trusted favorite!

Chinese Giant

Chinese Giant

The first of the truly giant bells, this wonderful pepper was introduced in 1900. It was twice as big as the largest bell pepper of its day. Plants are a compact 24″ tall. Fruits are usually 4″ by 4″, and if you thin the fruits, they can grow 5″ across and 6″ long. Truly remarkable both then and now. A ‘must-have’ sweet bell pepper!  These pepper plants produced really dark red peppers last year.

Jackpot

Jackpot

Thick walls, smooth skin, extra-long shape and — best of all — sweet flavor! 75 days. Only from Park, the long golden bell that breaks records whenever it is grown for show! Jackpot reaches 8 inches long, with broad 4-inch shoulders and a gently tapering, 3- to 4-lobed shape that is straight, smooth, and shiny. The bells emerge bright green, then mellow to a rich golden on vigorous 2-foot plants. they’re delicious, with a sweet bite and firm texture. TMV-resistant.  We had huge Jackpot Hybrid peppers last year – one was as big as a quart fruit jar and yielded 3 cups when chopped.

King of the North

King of the North

Early plant produces good yields of huge 6″ long by 4″ wide sweet bell peppers. Peppers have thick walls and turn from green to bright red when mature. A perfect stuffing pepper. Suitable for Northern regions.

Sweet Yellow

Sweet Yellow

Gardeners who have never succeeded with bell peppers should try this one. Matures 4-5 large, 4-lobed, blocky 4 x 4 inch fruit per plant. These shiny medium-green peppers are very thick walled and turn a beautiful golden yellow when fully ripe. Plant grows with an upright habit. The taste is crisp with an amazing sweetness.  A really pretty pepper.

Valencia

Valencia

F1 Hybrid Pepper. Plant produces good yields of 4 ” sweet orange bell peppers. Peppers turn from green to orange when mature. Excellent for salads, stuffing, or gourmet dishes. Disease Resistant.  The picture doesn’t do this pepper justice – it really is a nice dark orange.

La Rouge Royale

La Rouge Royale

F1 Hybrid Pepper. Plant produces good yields of 4 ” sweet orange bell peppers. Peppers turn from green to orange when mature. Excellent for salads, stuffing, or gourmet dishes. Disease Resistant.  New to Hawkins Springs Farm this year.

Red Marconi

Italian Red Marconi

Italian grilling pepper. About 6 to 8 inches long, the tapered green pepper will mature to red on the 30 inch plant. Marconi tastes excellent raw but is best when grilled. It has a memorable sweet, smoky flavor. Plants are resistant to Potato Virus Y and Tobacco Mosaic Virus, which means the plants tend to live longer for an improved yield. Peppers can be harvested in about 72 days from transplanting.  We loved this pepper last year.  When roasted and added to pasta dishes, it really does add that distinctive Italian pepper flavor.  These were a big hit last year at the Saturday Market at the Artichoke Restaurant.

There are 17 different hot peppers this year, including 6 different varieties of jalapenos – from the newest to the mildest, and we have 3 different habaneros,  After much research, we chose 9 of our peppers from the Chili Pepper Institute in New Mexico.

The 17 hot peppers available for the 2011 Season include:

Ancho Poblano

Ancho Poblano

One of the most popular chiles in Mexico, this mildly hot, blocky pepper is widely used for making chile rellenos and mole. Dark green turns to red when mature. Known as Poblano when fresh, Ancho when dried. Bushy, everbearing, pendant type plant. Sow seeds indoors 6-8 weeks before the last spring frost. Transplant when soils are warm, spacing seedlings 12-18 inches apart. Enrich soil with mature compost. Needs warm conditions day and night to germinate and fruit well. Harvesting tip: Harvest in the green or red stage.

Bhut Jolokia

Bhut Jolokia

The origin of the Bhut Jolokia goes back hundreds of years and can be traced to the state of Assam in northeastern India. It was originally grown in this region as well as in areas of Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan.

It is also called the following names-

Naga (Cobra snake) Jolokia in Sanskrit;   Raja Mirchi (King of Chilis);  Nai Miris (Cobra Chili) in Sri Lanka;  Naga Morich (Cobra Chili) in Bangladesh; and Oo-Morok (Tree Chili) in Manipur

It was not known to the Western world until around 2000. Bhut Jolokia seeds were brought to the United States to be planted and tested by members of the Chili Pepper Institute (CPI) located on the campus of the New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, New Mexico in 2001. Because of poor fruit and seed set, it took several years to get an acceptable field trial. Finally in 2005, at the Leyendecker Plant Science Research Center (1.5 miles south of Las Cruces) seeds were started in a plant medium under strict control and guidelines utilizing man-made chemical fertilizers. Professor Paul Bosland of NMSU was in charge and finally in the Fall of 2006, success was achieved. The Bhut Jolokia was confirmed as the world record holder by Guinness, and in February, 2007 it was official. Rated at 1,001,304 Scoville Heat Units (SHU), it bested by almost 2 times the old record holder the Red Savina Habanero.

Heritage Big Jim

Heritage Big Jim

NEW! NuMex Heritage Big Jim, Improved variety with a consistent hot heat level, pods that yield 10% more than the old Big Jim and has 20% more flavor compounds.  We are looking forward to this great pepper.

Jalmundo

Jalmundo

NMSU’s new jumbo jalapeno, large, meaty pods.

This will be a good jalapeno to compare to our Mucho Nacho jalapeno which performed superbly last year with huge jalapenos that just would not stop producing!

Pinata

Pinata

NuMex Pinata, from CPI, has average size, hotness, and flavor of a jalapeno, except that it is multicolor. Fruits change from bright green to bright yellow to orange finally to red.

This jalapeno will be great for those not fond of really hot jalapenos.

Primavera

Primavera

Mild jalapeno, large, meaty pods. From CPI.  This jalapeno will be perfect for those who prefer mild heat but love the flavor of the jalapeno.

Vaquero

Vaquero

Newest edition of the NMSU family, this is a better quality jalapeno with much more disease resistance than older varieties. Hot.

Jalapeno, Early

Jalapeno, Early

Traditional early strain.

2-2 1/2″ x 1″, sausage-shaped, blunt fruits mature early; dark green changing to red. Earlier, but lower yielding, than Conchos or El Jefe. Widely adapted.  This jalapeno is smaller and would be perfect for pickling whole or adding to hot pickle recipes.

Mucho Nacho

Mucho Nacho

This was a standout at Hawkins Springs Farm last year.  A jumbo sized hybrid jalapeno pepper that produces big 4 inch long fruits in abundance. Regular jalapenos are at least an inch shorter. Mucho Nacho is fatter, heavier, thicker and somewhat hotter. Like other jalapenos the fruits mature from green to red, but are used primarily in the green stage. Mucho Nacho are even hotter than standard jalapenos. Plants of Mucho Nacho show exceptional vigor, and under average conditions, they set a heavy load of extra-large, thick fleshed, meaty fruits which are ready for harvest 68 to 70 days after transplanting. This is about a week earlier than standard jalapeno strains, like Jalapeno M.

Jalapenos can be added to almost anything you want to spice up: salsas, stews, breads, sauces, dips, etc. They can be diced up and used as a topping for snack foods or roasted and stuffed with cheese, fish or meat to be used as a cocktail snack. Red ones are great in tamales, served as rajas, or roasted for soups. Red jalapenos are dried by smoking them, usually over mesquite wood.

Suave Red and Suave Orange

Suave Red

If you love the fruity flavor of habanero, but can’t take its fiery heat, take a look at this habanero -

The NuMex Suave Red, from CPI, is a mild habanero with only ~800 SHU, regular chinense flavor.

Orange Habanero

Orange Habanero

Tender Annual, Native to Central America’s tropical lowlands, this world-famous, scalding hot pepper thrives where summers are long, hot, and humid. Lantern-shaped fruits ripen to a lovely golden orange. Reported to be 1,000 times hotter than Jalapeno!  This little habanero just produces and produces.  The 6 plants we grew last year at Hawkins Springs Farm literally produced thousands of these fiery hot little peppers!

Red Savina

Red Savina

The Red Savina pepper is a cultivar of the habanero chili (Capsicum Chinense Jacquin), which has been selectively bred to produce hotter, heavier, and larger fruit.

Frank Garcia of GNS Spices, in Walnut, California, is credited with being the developer of the Red Savina habanero.  The exact method Garcia used to select the hottest strains is not publicly known.  Classified into a group called C. Chinese, Habaneros are among the hottest peppers in the world. The Red Savina Habanero held the record as the world’s hottest pepper from1994 until 2007 at 577,000 Scoville Units.  For comparison, that is twice as hot as regular Habanero chile (100,000~350,000 Scoville units), and 65 times as hot as Jalapeno pepper. A Cayenne pepper rates only 30,000~50,000 Scoville units.

In February 2007, the Red Savina chilli was displaced as the hottest chili in the world by the Bhut Jolokia (“Ghost”) pepper, though the Guinness World Records still lists the Red Savina as world’s hottest spice.

Red Savina pepper’s rank on the Scoville scale is 350,000~ 580,000.   Obviously not for the faint of heart!

Sunrise, Sunset and Eclipse Mix

Sunrise, Sunset and Eclipse Mix

These cultivars were unique in providing alternative mature fruit color in the New Mexican pod type. Medium heat level.  With all of this color variation, this pepper will be great to roast and freeze or can for colorful winter Mexican dishes.

Pasilla Bajo

Pasilla Bajo

Mildly hot pepper that turns from green to brown when mature.  This variety is mainly dried and used to make smoky flavored sauces.  We are looking forward to using this pepper in a new spicy sauce recipe.

Uba Tuba

Uba Tuba

“Rated as the pepper containing the highest natural antioxidants – tasty, sweet “wings” with some detectable heat in the center of the pepper.”

Same as Bishop’s Crown but with less heat. The 3 flaps of the fruits have no heat at all and can be extracted and eaten fresh. Center part of fruit is hot, be careful. This plant is often grown solely for its fruits which are actually often mistaken for flowers. Also a great ornamental. 80-90 days.  We pickled some of these last year and they were delicious!

Peter Peppers

Peter Pepper

Heirloom  Peppers

Not sold in stores due to the nature of how the pepper looks – like a you-know-what!.  But what most people do not know is:  it is great tasting and great for cooking.  This is a heirloom Hot Pepper that is VERY HOT.  They grow just about anywhere where warm temps exist.

Makes a very tasty and fun condiment pepper fresh as well as pickled.

Super Cayenne III

Super Cayenne III

Super Cayenne III Hybrid Hot Pepper is an improved version of the classic Cayenne. Vigorous, disease resistant plants set loads of super-hot 5-6 in. fruits with thin walls. Great for drying. 70 DAYS.  Wonderful flavor when dried and ground – beats any cayenne pepper product you buy at your grocer.

Sweet or hot, peppers add excitement to any dish. You can fry, roast stuff or grill them, or simply chop and add to salads.This cultivar, ‘Super Cayenne’ is a hybrid pepper that is extremely vigorous and has a good yield. Pepper fruits are hot, 4 inches long and slender, and deep red. Can be used when ripe or unripe. Great container plant. Likes a fertilizer treatment once a month. To keep compact, pinch leaves on young plants. Full sun produces best growth and fruiting results. C. annuum is the most cultivated pepper in the world, both commercially and in home gardens.

We will post an update on the scrolling announcements when the pepper plants are ready to purchase.   Look for our Farm signs located on Hwy 82 (at Road 310) going to Langley/Vinita and at Hwy 85 (at Road 470) one mile west of Ketchum where we will have our “Plants for Sale” signs posted and, as always, the fresh, home-grown produce for sale.

Thanks for looking!

Ronda

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