Spring Vegetables for the 2011 Season

cosmic_purple

The winter weeks seemed to have “inspired” Greg again – the varieties of vegetables to be grown for the spring and summer season have grown – again.  We have several new kinds of carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce, gourmet garlic and potatoes.  In addition to those new varieties, our gardens will boast shallots, leeks, edamame, and haricots vert for the first time.

Over the winter we have enlarged our gardens to almost triple the size of what we had last year. One of the reasons for the expansion is to accommodate the plasticulture program that we will be utilizing this year.  Our most intense labor in the springtime has been making raised garden rows, which involves raking the freshly tilled soil into raised beds.  Last year we had 15 long rows that we raised several inches and that took a lot of hard manual labor and a lot of time.  The plasticulture machine (don’t have a clue what it’s technical name is) will be making all of those rows for us as well as laying the irrigation tubing down then covering the row with plastic all in one pass – sure beats that manual labor.  However, the rows will be a little wider and we plan to widen the distance between each row this year as well.  That equates into needing a bit more room.  We will make a special post about our plasticulture program, with pictures, in a couple or three weeks.  Now back to the Spring veggies. . .

This year we are growing 3 varieties of broccoli and 4 varieties of Cauliflower (plants also available for purchase):

Arcadia

Arcadia F1 Hybrid

Recommended for summer, fall and winter production.  A rugged, vigorous broccoli with mid-late maturity. Big plants with heavy, very firm, dark green, domed heads with a unique “frosted” appearance. Resistant to head rot, brown bead, downy mildew, and tolerant of heat and cold stress. Days to Maturity or Bloom:   63

Calabrese

Calabrese Green Sprouting

Italian heirloom brought to America in the 1880’s.  5-8” heads and many side shoots.  Plants need rich soil and abundant moisture to produce a good crop.  After the main head is harvested, plants often produce smaller florets over a long season.  Always harvest broccoli just before the first flowers open.  Spring plantings often bolt to seed in hot summer.  Days to Maturity: 48

De Cicco

De Cicco

Favorite multi-cut Italian variety.  A traditional variety producing small, 3-4″, main heads projected well above the foliage followed by a large yield of side-shoot spears. Nonuniform in maturity, resulting in a long harvest period. Harvest main head when 3″ in diameter or less to encourage heavier side-shoot production. For spring or fall production. Days to Maturity or Bloom:   48

Purple of Sicily

Purple of Sicily

Beautiful, brilliant purple heads weigh 1.2 lbs and are of a fine, sweet flavor.  The heads cook to bright green.  Insect-resistant variety that is easier to grow than white varieties, rich in minerals; a colorful heirloom.  From select Italian seed. Needs rich soil and abundant moisture to produce a good crop.  Spring plantings often bolt to seed in hot summer weather.  Harvest: 65-70 days.

Amazing

White Amazing

For late summer and fall. Medium-sized plants with domed, solid curds and self-blanching, upright wrapper leaves when well fed. Tolerant to both heat and cold stress. Days to Maturity or Bloom:   68.

(I know – it says for “late summer and fall”, but we had to plant a few seeds for spring anyway and it should reach maturity before it gets very warm here in NE Oklahoma)

Fremont

White Fremont F1 Hybrid

For late summer and fall. Medium-sized plants with domed, solid curds and self-blanching, upright wrapper leaves when well fed. Tolerant to both heat and cold stress. Days to Maturity or Bloom:   68

Same for this variety – had to try a few for spring;)

Snow Crown

White Snow Crown F1 Hybrid

Remarkably early and dependable.  This hybrid shows unusual seedling vigor. Good-quality, medium-sized heads whether harvested in summer or fall. Good tolerance to moderate fall frost (25°-32°F/-4°-0°C). NOTE: Under fertility or moisture stress, it can show a purplish coloration on the undersides of the heads. Days to Maturity or Bloom:   50

Our Spring lettuces consist of 6 varieties of leaf and head lettuces:

Black Seeded Simpson

Black Seeded Simpson

Heirloom Hardy Annual

Introduced in 1850, this favorite loose leaf lettuce has sweet, large, light- green, crumpled leaves. Inner leaves blanch almost white. Slow-bolting, never bitter, early and adaptable.

Merlot

Merlot

This lettuce deserves to be in the flower garden! It is so red that it is almost purple. Striking, deep dark red, almost purple frilly leaves. A real eye-catcher in the garden and one of the darkest lettuces you can grow. The plant is nothing less than stunning. A very crisp and open headed leaf type that stands upright with a waxy shine that makes an ideal salad lettuce at every stage. It’s very high in antioxidants and non-bitter. Really colors up a salad and tastes great too.  From Holland.

Tom Thumb

Butterhead – Tom Thumb

Even though its heads are only the size of tennis balls, Tom Thumb still has that famous mild flavor, soft texture and blanched heart of the bigger butterhead lettuces.  It’s just the right size for single-serving salads.

Buttercrunch

Buttercrunch

Crisp, easy-to-grow butterhead with wonderful flavor and texture. Dependable, with solidly-furled leaves. Heat tolerant, slow to bolt. All America Selections winner in 1963.

Great Lakes #118

Crisphead  – Great Lakes #118

1944 All-America Selections Winner! If you’re an “iceberg” lettuce fan, you’ll love this easy-to-grow variety.  Given enough room to fully develop, Great lakes form large, with heads of crispy, serrated leaves.  Slower to bolt than other crisphead varieties. Excellent flavor and perfect for salads and sandwiches.

Parris Island Romaine

Parris Island Romaine (Cos)

Crunchy leaves, creamy white heart, and vigorous are just a few of the words that describe Parris Island Romaine. Named for Parris island off South Carolina, this old favorite Romaine deserves a try by any lettuce lover. 8″-12″ tall with upright, dark green leaves. Mosaic tolerant. Excellent for salads and garnishes. Excellent for Caesar salads.

Our Spring carrots include 7 different varieties, 3 of which are new and unusual:

Kyoto Red

Kyoto Red

Kyoto Red carrot is a Japanese traditional (heirloom) vegetable, dento yasai, grown in the Kyoto area. This is a Japanese kintoki-type (sweet red) carrot. Its glossy deep scarlet roots grow into beautifully tapered carrots 10-12″ long and are notably tender and sweet. Dark red color develops when about 3″ long.

Cosmic Purple

Cosmic Purple

This gorgeous and unique carrot is another variety high in antioxidants, including anthocyanin and lycopene, also high in Vitamin A. The Cosmic Purple Carrot has an imperator shape, bearing deep purple skin with a orange or yellow interior, kids love their unique colors, and they are right up the alley of those who enjoy unique vegetable varieties. Cosmic Purples grow to about 6-8″ with strong 18″ tops. A sweet and delicious carrot with the highest nutritional value, a great combination!

Atomic Red

Atomic Red

These neat red carrots are high in lycopene, the antioxidant credited with preventing several types of cancer. In fact they become even more beneficial when cooked, as the process makes the lycopene more available for your body to use. The Atomic Red Carrot bears tapered red roots, up to 10″ long, a sweet and delicious carrot. Try them fresh in salads to add color, or cooked, as cooking intensifies the lovely red color of these unique carrots. Kids of all ages will love them! Try something different and healthy this year.

Scarlet Nantes

Scarlet Nantes

A French heirloom introduced in 1855. The Scarlet Nantes Carrot is sweet, juicy, and nearly coreless. Stout, blunt roots grow to about 4-6″, bright red-orange in color, and full of flavor. High in vitamins. A great choice for fresh eating, freezing and juicing.

Long Imperator #58

Long Imperator #58

The Imperator carrot is longer and thinner than other varieties of carrot. Does best in loose soils. The Imperator 58 Carrot is well suited for all uses, with excellent flavor. Grows to 9″ long, with smooth, fine-grained, deep- orange flesh.

Danver’s Half Long

Danver’s Half Long

Blocky-topped, tapered roots chunk up nicely at 6 to 7 1/2 in. More-than-generous yields. Stores well and stays crisp.

Sweetness II

Sweetness II

Early, sweet, and high yielding! Cylindrical roots are deep orange and very strong, stuffed with sweet flavor throughout their 6- to 8-inch length. strong tops, great performance and very high yields in sandy or loamy soils, where many carrots do not flourish. Early to mature and very productive Higher in vitamins A and B than their store-bought counterparts, home-grown carrots are also rich in calcium and phosphorus.

We will post an update on the scrolling announcements when the broccoli and cauliflower plants are ready to purchase – which won’t be too much longer, as well as when the lettuce is ready (we have already planted some lettuces in the raised bed on Feb 22); a few carrots have been planted in pots in the greenhouse.  More are going into the raised bed soon.  Radishes will be planted at the appropriate times in order to be ready when the leaf lettuce is ready – gotta have the fresh radishes for wilted lettuce!  And we will post those radish varieties once they are planted.  Look for our Farm signs located on Hwy 82 (at Road 310) going to Langley/Vinita and at Hwy 85 (at Road 470) going to Ketchum where we will have our “Plants for Sale” signs posted and, as always, the fresh, home-grown produce for sale.

See you soon with the radish varieties.

Both comments and pings are currently closed.

2 Responses to “Spring Vegetables for the 2011 Season”

  1. can’t wait for the carrots. I am “juicing” ( eight ounces every morning) – trying to replace coffee, and it is good. I am buying 15 pounds California organic carrots every two weeks $15. … so I am looking forward to that.
    sounds like you farmers have everything under control – thank God, because nobody else seems to.
    people are catching on to this healthier way of eating and you guys are going to get rich. . ( I hope)
    keep us posted…………

    • Ronda says:

      Glad to hear the juicing is working for you – I should drag my juicer out and try that :) We’ll keep you posted – it takes carrots a long time to make so it will be a while yet for those.

Powered by WordPress | Designed by: SRI SERVICES | Thanks to Hawkins Springs Bath and Body, SUV and game videos